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niacinamide ageless perfection cream

What is niacinamide and how does it benefit skincare?

Niacinamide is a form of vitamin B3, which is an essential nutrient that plays a role in many bodily functions, including the metabolism of energy, DNA repair, and the production of hormones. In skincare, niacinamide is used for its potential to improve the appearance of the skin, specifically hyperpigmentation, fine lines and wrinkles, and overall skin health.

Niacinamide has several benefits for the skin:

  • Brightening: It can help to reduce the appearance of hyperpigmentation and age spots.
  • Moisturizing: It can help to improve the skin’s barrier function, which can lead to a decrease in transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and an increase in hydration.
  • Anti-aging: It can help to increase collagen production, which can lead to a decrease in the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.
  • Anti-inflammatory: It can help to reduce inflammation in the skin, which can lead to a decrease in redness and sensitivity.
  • Acne-fighting and sebum regulation: It can help to reduce the production of sebum, which can lead to a decrease in the appearance of acne.

Niacinamide is considered safe for most people to use topically, and it can be used in conjunction with other skincare ingredients for added benefits. It’s generally recommended to use 2-5% of Niacinamide in your product for best results and less chance of irritation, especially if you have sensitive skin or other skin conditions.

 

How much niacinamide per day is good for skincare?

The recommended daily amount of niacinamide for skincare is not well established. However, studies have shown that using niacinamide in concentrations of 2-5% as a topical treatment can be effective for improving the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, and hyperpigmentation, as well as increasing the production of ceramides, which can help strengthen the skin’s barrier function and improve overall skin health.

It’s important to note that while it’s safe to use niacinamide in topical form at concentrations of up to 5%, it’s best to watch your skin to see how it’ll respond, especially if you have sensitive skin or other skin conditions.

Also an important note: Niacinamide is a water-soluble vitamin, so it’s non-toxic even at high doses, however, it’s recommended to use 2-5% of Niacinamide in your product for best results and less chance of irritation.

 

skincare benefits niacinamide

 

What are the best sources of niacinamide for skincare?

Niacinamide is typically found in skincare products such as serums, creams, and moisturizers. The best sources of niacinamide for skincare are those that have a high concentration of niacinamide, typically between 2-5%, and are formulated with other beneficial ingredients that can enhance its effectiveness.

Some of the best sources of niacinamide for skincare include:

  • Topical skincare products specifically formulated with niacinamide, such as our Micro Algae Immun B3 Serum, Ageless Perfection Cream and Gentle Gardenia Anti-Pollution Gel Cleanser.
  • Sunscreen and body care products that contain niacinamide.
  • Niacinamide supplements, which can be taken orally in pill form. However, it’s important to consult with a healthcare professional to determine if oral niacinamide supplements are appropriate for you and to make sure you are taking the appropriate dosage.

 

sensitive skin niacinamide

Can people with sensitive skin use niacinamide safely?

Niacinamide is generally considered safe for most people to use topically, including people with sensitive skin. However, as with any skincare ingredient, some people may experience irritation or allergic reactions when using products containing niacinamide.

If you have sensitive skin, it’s important to start by using products with a small amount of niacinamide and to monitor your skin for any signs of irritation, such as redness, itching, or stinging. If you experience any of these symptoms, it’s best to discontinue use and give your skin a little break.

Also, it’s recommended to use products that contain 2-5% of niacinamide for best results and less chance of irritation. It’s also best to avoid using niacinamide with other potentially irritating ingredients, such as harsh exfoliants or high concentrations of retinoids.

It’s also important to note that people with sensitive skin should also be mindful of the pH level of the product, as niacinamide is known to work best at a pH between 5-7.

In summary, while niacinamide is generally considered safe for most people to use topically, people with sensitive skin may need to take extra precautions when using products containing niacinamide, such as using a lower concentration, monitoring for irritation, and avoiding using with other potentially irritating ingredients.

Are there any other ingredients that can be combined with niacinamide for better results?

Niacinamide is a popular skincare ingredient that has been proven to reduce inflammation and provide hydration for the skin. However, many people are looking for ways to maximize its effects. By combining niacinamide with other ingredients, it’s possible to get even better results than using it alone. From natural oils and extracts to other vitamins, there are plenty of ingredients that can be combined with niacinamide to give your skin the nourishment it needs.

 

Is it better to take a supplement or use a topical cream containing niacinamide?

 

Niacinamide is a form of vitamin B3 that has been gaining popularity in recent years due to its numerous benefits. It can be taken as a supplement or applied topically in the form of creams or serums. Taking niacinamide orally has been found to be effective in treating acne, reducing wrinkles, and improving skin hydration. On the other hand, topical application of niacinamide can help reduce redness and inflammation, improve skin texture, and brighten the complexion. Ultimately, it depends on your individual needs and preferences when deciding which option is best for you.

 

How does oral supplements versus topical cream containing niacinamide work?

Both oral supplements and topical creams containing niacinamide can be effective for improving skin health, but they work in different ways.

Topical creams containing niacinamide can be applied directly to the skin, where it can then be absorbed and work to improve the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, hyperpigmentation, and overall skin texture and tone. This is due to niacinamide is able to penetrate the skin barrier and reach deeper layers of the skin.

Oral supplements containing niacinamide, on the other hand, are taken internally and work to improve skin health from within. They can help to improve the overall health of the skin by reducing inflammation, reducing the production of sebum, and improving the skin’s barrier function.

Both oral supplements and topical creams can be effective, but they work in different ways. It’s important to consult a dermatologist or other medical professional before starting to use any new skincare product, especially if you have sensitive skin or other skin conditions, as ingredients that may work for some people may not be suitable for others. It’s also important to note that oral supplements containing niacinamide should be taken under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they may interact with certain medications or have other side effects.

 

Too much niacinamide is not always good for your skin: Is 20% niacinamide in creams or serum too much for my skin?

The ideal concentration of niacinamide in skincare products can vary depending on the individual and the product formulation. Typically, products containing 2-5% niacinamide are considered to be effective for improving skin health with less chance of irritation.

A 20% concentration of niacinamide is considered to be high, and it may be too strong for some people’s skin. High concentrations of niacinamide can cause skin irritation, dryness, and redness. If you have sensitive skin, it’s best to start with a lower concentration of niacinamide and work your way up, as high concentrations of niacinamide may cause irritation.

In summary, 20% niacinamide is considered to be high concentration and may be too strong for some people’s skin, especially for those with sensitive skin. It’s best to start with a lower concentration and work your way up, and stop using it if you think you are developing sensitivities.

What can I use in my skincare regimen to incorporate Niacinamide?

Our Ageless Perfection Cream, Supreme Recontour Eye Concentrate and Micro Algae Immun B3 Serum, infused with Niacinamide, are the perfect solutions! Niacinamide is an incredibly powerful antioxidant that helps reduce wrinkles and other signs of inflammaging. Our proprietary formulas also contain other powerful ingredients like natural Hyaluronic acid – Snow Mushroom, Vitamin C, Vitamin E and more that help visibly lock in moisture and protect from environmental damage. Plus, they’re gentle enough to use every day.

Our customers have already seen incredible results – now it’s your turn! Try any of them today and see visible results in as little as four weeks!

 

niacinamide good for skin

 

Scientific References

  • Draelos, Z. D., Matsubara, A., & Smiles, K. (2006). The effect of 2% niacinamide on facial sebum production. Journal of Cosmetic and Laser Therapy: Official Publication of the European Society for Laser Dermatology, 8(2), 96–101.
  • Bissett, D. L., Oblong, J. E., & Berge, C. A. (2006). Niacinamide: A B Vitamin that Improves Aging Facial Skin Appearance. In Dermatologic Surgery, Vol. 31, pp. 860–866
  • Bissett, D. L., Miyamoto, K., Sun, P., Li, J., & Berge, C. A. (2004). Topical Niacinamide reduces yellowing, wrinkling, red blotchiness, and hyperpigmented spots in aging facial skin1. International Journal of Cosmetic Science, 26(5), 231–238.
  • Yu, J. M., Liu, Y., Xie, N., Sun, W., Wang, J. J., & Li, H. Q. (2002). Effects of nicotinamide on levels of dermis hydroxyproline in photoaging skin. Huanjing Yu Jiankang Zazhi, 19, 102–104.
  • Shalita, A. R., Graham Smith, J., Parish, L. C., Sofman, M. S., & Chalker, D. K. (1995). Topical nicotinamide compared with clindamycin gel in the treatment of inflammatory acne vulgaris. International Journal of Dermatology Vol. 34, Issue 6, pp. 434–437
    Griffits et al.. (1995). Nicotinamide 4% gel for the treatment of inflammatory acne vulgaris. The Journal of Dermatological Treatment, 6, 8–10.

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