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what is dermohacking in skincare

As we age, our skin undergoes a series of changes that can lead to the loss of elasticity, wrinkles, and age spots. One of the key drivers of these changes is a process called senescence, which refers to the permanent growth arrest of cells.

In this scientific article, we will explore what senescence is in skincare, how it affects our skin barrier health, and how we can use autophagy and “dermohacking” to prevent and counteract the effects of senescence on our skin.

What is Senescence in Skincare?

Senescence is a natural biological process in which cells stop dividing and become dormant. This process can be triggered by a variety of factors, including DNA damage, oxidative stress, and inflammation. In the context of skincare, senescence can have a profound impact on the health and appearance of our skin. As senescent cells accumulate, they can cause inflammation, reduce collagen production, and damage the skin’s natural barrier function.

These changes include wrinkles, sagging skin and age spots. The skin loses its elasticity and firmness over time due to the decrease in collagen and elastin production. Other factors such as sun exposure, smoking and stress can also contribute to the signs of aging on the skin. It is important to take steps to protect your skin from these external factors in order to reduce the effects of senescence on your skin.

dermohacking skin aging

How Does Senescence Affect Our Skin Barrier Health?

The skin barriers are the outermost layer of our skin, and is responsible for protecting us from external irritants and maintaining hydration. Our skin barriers play a crucial role in protecting us from environmental stressors such as UV radiation, pollution, and pathogens. Senescence can have a negative impact on the health of our skin barriers by reducing the production of ceramides, which are essential lipids that help to maintain the barrier’s integrity. This can lead to increased water loss, dryness, and irritation.
Additionally, senescent cells can secrete pro-inflammatory molecules that further damage the skin barrier and promote inflammation and inflammaging.

 

What is Autophagy? How Does it Help to Remove Senescent Cells?

Autophagy is a process in which immune cells in your body (like macrophages and dendritic cells) recycle damaged or unwanted components to maintain cellular homeostasis. This process is crucial for removing senescent cells, as it allows the body to clear out these non-dividing cells and replace them with healthy ones. Autophagy also helps to clear away damaged proteins and organelles that can accumulate inside the cell over time. This process helps keep the cell healthy and functioning properly. Additionally, autophagy plays an important role in removing cellular waste products which can be toxic if left unchecked. By clearing out senescent cells through autophagy, our bodies are able to remain healthy and functioning optimally for longer periods of time.

Studies have shown that autophagy can reduce the effects of senescence on the skin, including inflammation and loss of collagen production. In the context of skincare, autophagy can help to remove senescent cells and reduce inflammation. Recent research has shown that supporting autophagy through the use of skincare products can have a significant impact on the health and appearance of our skin.

Skincare products can visibly help with autophagy by providing the necessary nutrients and antioxidants that promote healthy cell turnover and reduce signs of inflammation. Skincare products that contain ingredients such as Vitamin C, Niacinamide, ceramides and peptides can help to improve texture, tone, hydration levels, and overall complexion.

Intercepting the Signaling of Harmful Chemicals

In addition to senescence, our skin is constantly exposed to a variety of harmful chemicals, including air pollution, UV radiation, environmental aggressors and toxins that in turn can speed up senescence. These chemicals can cause oxidative stress and damage to our skin cells, leading to premature aging and reduced skin health. These chemicals can activate signaling pathways that lead to inflammation, oxidative stress, and DNA damage. Intercepting the signaling of these harmful chemicals can help to prevent senescence and reduce inflammation and signs of inflammaging mirroring on our skin.

 

Preventing Signs of Senescence with “Dermohacking” Skincare

Senescence is a natural process that occurs in our cells as we age. However, external factors such as UV radiation, pollution, and smoking can accelerate this process, leading to premature aging of the skin. Fortunately, there are ways to slow down or even prevent senescence, including the use of skincare products.

One way to prevent senescence is by using products that contain antioxidants. Antioxidants are compounds that can neutralize free radicals, which are molecules that can damage our cells and contribute to aging. Some commonly used antioxidants in skincare products include vitamin C, vitamin E, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) [1,2].

Another way to prevent senescence is by stimulating autophagy, a process by which cells break down and recycle damaged or dysfunctional components. This can help to remove senescent cells and prevent their accumulation, which can lead to age-related diseases. Skincare products containing ingredients such as retinoids, alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs), and polyphenols have been shown to induce autophagy in skin cells [3,4,5].

Preventing senescence through “dermohacking” is a growing area of interest in the skincare industry. This involves the use of skincare products that support cellular health and promote autophagy, while also providing protective benefits against harmful chemicals. Products such as creams, serums, and masks can contain ingredients like retinoids, peptides, and growth factors, which have been shown to promote cellular turnover and collagen production. Additionally, natural ingredients like green tea, aloe vera, and chamomile can provide soothing and anti-inflammatory benefits.

In addition, skincare products can intercept the signaling of harmful chemicals that can accelerate senescence. For example, some ingredients such as niacinamide and licorice extract can inhibit the production of inflammatory cytokines, which can cause cellular damage and contribute to aging [6,7].

Lastly, some skincare products are designed to “dermohack” senescence, which involves modulating the signaling pathways involved in senescence to prevent its harmful effects on the skin. Our formulations contain unique combinations of antioxidants, peptides, and plant extracts to help protect the skin from environmental stressors and visibly promote cellular repair and regeneration against signs of inflammaging. For example, Matrixyl 3000 in Green Caviar Facial Oil Elixir is a peptide complex that can help stimulate collagen production and help reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles (8). Plant extracts, including green tea, rosehip, and sea buckthorn have been shown to help soothe signs of inflammation and promote rejuvenation (9,10,11). Skincare ingredients like niacinamide, peptides, and vitamins can help to prevent the accumulation of senescent cells and delay the aging process [12].

Overall, senescence is a natural process that occurs in our cells as we age, but external factors can accelerate this process. Using skincare products containing antioxidants, autophagy-inducing ingredients, inflammation inhibitors, and dermohacking agents can help to prevent signs of senescence and delay the signs of inflammatory aging.

How Does “Dermohacking” Senescence Help with Skin Inflammaging?

Inflammaging is a term used to describe the chronic inflammation associated with the aging process [13]. Senescence, the process by which cells stop dividing and become dysfunctional, is a major contributor to inflammaging. [14]. Senescent cells produce a range of inflammatory cytokines, which can cause damage to surrounding cells and contribute to chronic inflammation [15]. Therefore, strategies that help to prevent or remove senescent cells can have a positive impact on inflammaging. This is where “dermohacking” senescence comes into play.

“Dermohacking” senescence is a term used to describe the use of skincare products and ingredients that can help prevent or delay the accumulation of senescent cells, which can contribute to inflammaging and accelerate the aging process. Senescent cells are cells that have stopped dividing and can secrete inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and proteases that can cause cellular damage and contribute to the development of inflammaging. By promoting cellular health and reducing inflammation, “dermohacking” senescence can help to reduce the signs of inflammaging and improve skin health.

Several studies have shown that “dermohacking” senescence can help prevent or delay the accumulation of senescent cells and contribute to the reduction of inflammaging in the skin. For example, studies have shown that the use of skincare ingredients such as niacinamide, peptides, and vitamins can help prevent the accumulation of senescent cells and delay the aging process [16].

In addition, studies have shown that the use of certain skincare ingredients such as retinoids, alpha-hydroxy acids, and antioxidants can help improve skin texture, reduce the appearance of wrinkles and fine lines, and improve the overall appearance of aging skin [17,18]. By reducing inflammation, these ingredients can help to prevent damage to surrounding cells and reduce the production of inflammatory cytokines by senescent cells.

This can help prevent the accumulation of senescent cells and contribute to the reduction of signs of inflammaging in the skin.

skin aging inflammaging

 

 

In conclusion, “dermohacking” senescence can be an effective strategy for preventing signs of inflammaging and promoting the wellness of healthy skin. However, you can prevent the accumulation of senescent cells and delay the inflammaging process to improve skin texture, reduce the appearance of wrinkles and fine lines and to help reduce signs of chronic inflammation in the skin. With the help of science-backed ingredients like those found in AveSeena formulations, you can achieve healthier, more youthful-looking skin.

 

 

Scientific References

1. Farris, P. K. (2012). Topical vitamin C: A useful agent for treating photoaging and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic surgery, 28(3), 355-360.
2. Burke, K. E. (2007). Interaction of vitamin C and iron. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1031(1), 350-355.
3. Mukherjee, S., Date, A., Patravale, V., Korting, H. C., & Roeder, A. (2006). Retinoids in the treatment of skin aging: an overview of clinical efficacy and safety. Clinical interventions in aging, 1(4), 327.
4. Kim, D. S., Park, S. H., Kwon, S. B., & Li, K. (2015). α-Hydroxy acids in the treatment of signs of skin aging. Clinics in dermatology, 33(2), 226-232.
5. Davinelli, S., & Scapagnini, G. (2019). Polyphenols as dietary supplements: A double-edged sword. Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases, 29(5), 502-506.
6. Kim J, Kim M, Lee J, Choi H, Park G. Topical application of niacinamide-containing facial moisturizer improves skin barrier function in healthy human subjects. Int J Cosmet Sci. 2018;40(4):366-370. doi:10.1111/ics.12471
7. Gong M, Liu X, Liu Y, Sun J, Zhang T, Kang J, Zhu Z. Liquiritigenin alleviates skin aging in UVB-induced premature aging mice through the inflammatory pathway. J Dermatol Sci. 2018;91(2):144-152. doi:10.1016/j.jdermsci.2018.05.003
8. El-Domyati M, et al. Topical application of Matrixyl 3000 promotes the synthesis of collagen and reduces the appearance of wrinkles. Am J Cosmet Dermatol. 2013;9(3):e90-e96.
9. Han M, et al. Green tea (Camellia sinensis) and skin health. Nutrients. 2019;11(10):2386.
10. Phetcharat L, et al. The effectiveness of a standardized rose hip powder, containing seeds and shells of Rosa canina, on cell longevity, skin wrinkles, moisture, and elasticity. Clin Interv Aging. 2015;10:1849-1856.
11. Yang B, et al. Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) berry oil extracts protect against chronic UVB-induced skin damage in hairless mice by modulating antioxidant and inflammatory responses. J Nutr Biochem. 2019;73:108212.
12. Kim BH, Lee E, Kim SY, Choi KC. Roles of natural compounds on the senescence factors of skin. Int J Mol Sci. 2019;20(21):5298. doi:10.3390/ijms20215298.
13. Franceschi, C., Garagnani, P., Parini, P., Giuliani, C., & Santoro, A. (2018). Inflammaging: a new immune–metabolic viewpoint for age-related diseases. Nature Reviews Endocrinology, 14(10), 576-590.
14. Krutmann, J., & Schroeder, P. (2013). Role of mitochondria in photoaging of human skin: the defective powerhouse model. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 133(10), 2310-2312.
15.Childs, B. G., Durik, M., Baker, D. J., & van Deursen, J. M. (2015). Cellular senescence in aging and age-related disease: from mechanisms to therapy. Nature Medicine, 21(12), 1424-1435.
16. Bissett, D. L., Miyamoto, K., Sun, P., & Li, J. (2004). Topical niacinamide reduces yellowing, wrinkling, red blotchiness, and hyperpigmented spots in aging facial skin. International journal of cosmetic science, 26(5), 231-238.
18. Mukherjee S, Date A, Patravale V, Korting HC, Roeder A, Weindl G. Retinoids in the treatment of skin aging: an overview of clinical efficacy and safety. Clin Interv Aging. 2006;1(4):327-348. doi:10.2147/ciia.2006.1.4.327
19. Draelos ZD. Skin aging and prevention: an update. Int J Womens Dermatol. 2019;5(2):75-84. doi:10.1016/j.ijwd.2018.10.002

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